From wikipedia, the history of tai chi:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tai_chi

“The Chen family trace their art back to Chen Wangting in the 17th century. Martial arts historian Xu Zhen claimed that the tai chi of Chen Village was influenced by the Taizu changquan style practiced at nearby Shaolin Monastery, while Tang Hao thought it was derived from a treatise by Ming dynasty general Qi Jiguang, Jixiao Xinshu (“New Treatise on Military Efficiency”), which discussed several martial arts styles including Taizu changquan.[17][18]

What is now known as tai chi appears to have received this appellation around the mid-19th century.[16] Imperial Court scholar Ong Tong witnessed a demonstration by Yang Luchan before Yang had established his reputation as a teacher. Afterwards Ong wrote: “Hands holding Tai chi shakes the whole world, a chest containing ultimate skill defeats a gathering of heroes.” Before this time the art may have had other names, and appears to have been generically described by outsiders as zhan quan (沾拳, “touch boxing”), Mian Quan (“soft boxing”) or shisan shi (十三式, “the thirteen techniques”).[19]

Standardization

In 1956 the Chinese government sponsored the Chinese Sports Committee (CSC), which brought together four wushu teachers to truncate the Yang family hand form to 24 postures. This was an attempt to standardize t’ai-chi ch’üan for wushu tournaments, because many tai chi teachers had either moved out of China or stopped teaching after the Chinese Civil War. They wanted to create a routine that would be much less difficult to learn than the classical 88 to 108 posture solo hand forms.

Another 1950s form is the “97 movements combined t’ai-chi ch’üan form”, which blends Yang, Wu, Sun, Chen, and Fu styles.

In 1976, they developed a slightly longer demonstration form that would not require the traditional forms’ memory, balance, and coordination. This became the “Combined 48 Forms” that were created by three wushu coaches, headed by Men Hui Feng. The combined forms simplified and combined classical forms from the original Chen, Yang, Wu, and Sun styles. Other competitive forms were designed to be completed within a six-minute time limit.

In the late 1980s, CSC standardized more competition forms for the four major styles as well as combined forms. These five sets of forms were created by different teams, and later approved by a committee of wushu coaches in China. These forms were named after their style: the “Chen-style national competition form” is the “56 Forms”. The combined forms are “The 42-Form” or simply the “Competition Form”.

In the 11th Asian Games of 1990, wushu was included as an item for competition for the first time with the 42-Form representing t’ai-chi ch’üan. The International Wushu Federation (IWUF) applied for wushu to be part of the Olympic games.[20]"

difference between qigong, chikung and tai chi

https://www.celestialtaichi.com.au/health-benefits/2021-05-so-whats-the-difference-between-qigong-and-taichi/

guided tai chi vr app overview

https://6dofreviews.com/reviews/apps/guided-tai-chi/

There are only 20 different hand motions,

100 programs of around 3 or 5 minutes

10 scenes

books